Friday, 30 January 2015

The Heroes, Gods and Monsters of Masters of Blood and Bone

With only a couple of days left of pre-orders to go (offical release date 3rd February), I thought I'd write a short blog on Masters of Blood and Bone (publisher by Darkfuse).

The main character is Matthew Doyle Holland, but his daughter Ank runs a close second. He's a hitman for hire to gods, her, a supremely gifted young woman with secrets and powers that are far beyond his. The story, and follow up stories (yes, there are more than just this tale) centre on Holland's neverending fight against those that would do them harm.

The novel, and the backdrop, rely in part on imagination...simply making up a good story. But, also mythology. Gods, of the ancient variety. I suppose it came in part from wondering if, when over time the old gods fall out of favour and no one worships them any longer...do they simply go away?

In this novel? Nope. There are a whole host of gods and legends in this novel. Roman, Greek, but monsters both mythical and biblical, too...I think the basic premise is that these gods and monsters, these legends, they never really went away.

In Masters of Blood and Bone, they're coming back.


The cover art (Zach McCain) 
'One of the best covers I have seen in a long time.' The Examiner.

To purchase, visit Amazon wherever you are. It will be available in paperback, and Darkfuse will carry a limited, signed hardcover, too. To read a short excerpt, click here: Masters of Blood and Bone. 

Finally, an excerpt of the review from The Examiner:

“Masters of Blood and Bone” combines the quirkiness of Dean Koontz’s Odd Thomas series with the hardcore mythology of Clive Barker to create an adventure that is both entertaining and terrifying. This is horror adventure at its finest. Holland and Ank must battle evil across a world that is at times sublime, hilarious, and terrifying. Saunders gives the reader characters that are both larger-than-life yet also supremely human so that the reader is given a rare journey through the end of the world in a fantastic yet accessible way that turns the reader into a participant rather than an observer. This novel will make the reader cringe and cheer. At the end of the novel, I felt elated and thoroughly satisfied with this rare treat from a master of horror. I had enjoyed the previous books I had read from Saunders but this novel takes it to the next level and gets my highest possible recommendation to any horror fan.

Thanks, as always, for reading.